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Non-clinical Positions

Non-clinical jobs are those that do not involve direct patient care. They might include administration, environmental, or maintenance positions. Some are entry-level and only require a high school diploma or associate degree. Here are 9 types of non-clinical hospital jobs.

Non-clinical Positions

Non-clinical jobs are those that do not involve direct patient care. They might include administration, environmental, or maintenance positions. Some are entry-level and only require a high school diploma or associate degree. Here are 9 types of non-clinical hospital jobs.

Medical secretary

Medical secretaries provide medical-specific administrative support including communicating with patients and managing medical charts, plus scheduling appointments, directing visitors and more.

Projected employment growth (2018–2028): 11 percent or higher

Education: Medical Administrative Assistant Certificate

 

Health information technician (HIT)

Health information technicians process medical information and manage records. The healthcare industry’s transition to universally using electronic health records creates a demand for trained professionals to maintain, organize and protect healthcare records and data.

Projected employment growth (2018–2028): 11 percent

Education: Health Information Technician Associate’s degree

 

Maintenance Technician

Maintenance technicians keep hospital facilities running, performing duties that ensure a safe and clean environment for patients. Tasks may include repairs, cleaning, and general upkeep of the physical building.

 

Housekeeper

Hospital housekeepers maintain a clean space for patients to heal. Tasks performed include making beds, changing linens, cleaning floors, and restocking medical supplies.

 

Medical coder

Medical coders transcribe medical notes on what procedures or services were done in appointments and apply ICD-10 codes for billing and insurance purposes.

Projected growth (2018–2028): 11 percent or higher

Education: Medical Coding Certificate

 

Medical admissions clerk

Admissions clerks greet patients entering the hospital and gather their medical and personal information and reason for visiting. They check the patient in and file their data in the hospital’s system. They also collect and enter insurance information. When not interacting with patients, medical admissions clerks might answer phones, record data and communicate with nurses and doctors.

 

Food service worker

Food service prepares and delivers meals to patients, making sure that each patient is given the correct tray depending on dietary recommendations and restrictions. Food service workers must also maintain a well organized and stocked cafeteria for patients and visitors.

 

Medical records clerk

Medical records clerks organize and file patient information, such as personal and medical histories, and admission and discharge documents. They give hospital departments the records and paperwork they request. They are responsible for keeping records confidential, secure and up to date. Medical records clerks also provide information and support during hospital audits.

 

Medical social worker

Social workers help patients and their families deal with the physical, emotional and financial stress of hospitalization. They meet with and talk to patients about what to expect from their condition and the recovery process. They also provide support for patients and families going through difficult situations, such as being diagnosed with a life-threatening condition. Social workers also teach nurses and doctors how to handle patients with issues like depression or anxiety.

 

Human resources manager

Human resources managers oversee all hospital employee and personnel needs. They recruit, hire and train new employees and communicate with existing staff to resolve conflicts and enforce workplace policies. HR managers also handle the hospital’s salary budget, benefits programs and professional development opportunities. They ensure the hospital follows state and federal regulations and provides a safe workplace for employees.

 

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